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What is Snagging in Construction?

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Ever purchased a new property only to discover a myriad of problems lurking behind the fresh paint and shiny fixtures? The snagging process is here to help!

This comprehensive guide delves into the world of knowledge of “what is snagging in construction”, its importance, and for example of how it ensures quality and safety standards for your new property. Let’s dive in!

Understanding Snagging in Construction

Snagging is an essential aspect of the construction industry, as it involves identifying and addressing imperfections or issues in a project to guarantee quality and safety standards.

Snagging ensures client satisfaction by rectifying minor problems as well as more serious defects that may arise during construction. A snag list is a compilation of defects or omissions in building work that require rectification by the contractor at the construction site.

The snagging process typically takes place following the completion of both the first and second fix of a construction project, ensuring that all aspects of construction project meet the required quality control and safety standards.

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A new build snagging survey is a comprehensive assessment that identifies any deficiencies or irregularities in a recently constructed property. This type of survey should ideally be conducted within two years of the property’s construction.

The snagging process is not only crucial for quality control, but also has a significant impact on the growth and reputation of a construction company.

The Role of Snagging in Construction Projects

Snagging plays a critical role in maintaining quality control and preventing future issues in construction projects. The snagging inspection is an important step during the practical completion of a building project.

The certifying authority architect or contract administrator is typically responsible for performing this inspection. Contractors are responsible for generating snag lists and ensuring that all defects are addressed promptly, as delays may lead the builders to additional costs and a tarnished reputation.

In larger construction projects, snagging inspections are conducted in sections to ensure thoroughness and efficiency. This methodical approach helps identify potential issues that may have gone unnoticed, guaranteeing that the building will be safe and up to code before being handed over to the client.

The Difference Between Minor and Serious Defects

Minor defects are small issues that can be easily fixed and do not impact the usability of the building. These can include paint touch-ups, loose fixtures, or other easily rectifiable problems.

While some building issues can be easily addressed, more serious defects can have a detrimental impact on the structural integrity of the building and may necessitate significant repairs or even legal action. Examples of serious defects include foundation issues, extensive water damage, or major electrical faults.

Understanding the difference between minor defects and serious defects is essential, as it helps prioritize the snagging process and ensures that the most pressing issues are addressed first. This distinction also helps contractors and clients allocate resources and time effectively during the snagging process.

The Snagging Process: Inspection to Resolution

The snagging process involves three main stages: inspection, creating a snag list, and resolving the issues. The initial step entails conducting a comprehensive inspection of the property to identify any defects or issues that need to be addressed.

Once all snags have been identified, they are compiled into a snag list, which includes details such as the item number, location, issue type, responsible person, and the item’s status (outstanding or completed).

After the snag list is created, the issues must be resolved before the final inspection of considered complete building project is conducted. The final inspection should take place once all snags have been rectified and before the property receives its certificate of completion. This ensures that the complete property is free of defects and adheres to the required quality and safety standards.

Inspection Process and Techniques

Inspections should be thorough and carried out in sections for larger projects, such as multi-storey buildings, to ensure a comprehensive assessment of the property. An estimated time of one hour is sufficient for inspecting a 100 square meter area.

Once the full inspection process is completed, the relevant authorities should mark the area as “checked” and restrict access to ensure security or indicate it for repair work, depending on the inspection results.

During the inspection process, it is crucial to document any visual evidence of defects or issues, as this can be used as proof to demonstrate the builder’s responsibility to rectify the problems. This documentation can also serve as a reference for future inspections or for the final inspection before the property is handed over to the owner.

Creating and Managing a Snag List

A detailed and accurate snag list should be compiled during the snagging process, including item number, location, issue type, responsible person, and status (outstanding or completed). This list is essential in ensuring that all defects are identified and addressed before the property is handed over to the owner.

It also serves as a record of the issues found during the inspection process, helping to prevent disputes and misunderstandings between the contractor and the client.

Managing a snag list effectively involves regular updates and communication with all relevant stakeholders, including the client, contractor, and architect. By keeping everyone informed of the progress in resolving snags, misunderstandings can be avoided, and the snagging process can be completed more efficiently.

Resolving Snags and Final Inspection

Resolving snags involves fixing the identified issues and conducting a final inspection before handing over the property to the owner.

It is recommended to employ the services of a professional snagging services company to generate a snagging report and maintain a log of all communications and commitments made by the builder. This report can serve as proof of the builder’s responsibility to correct the issues within a specified time frame.

The final inspection should take place once all snags have been rectified and prior to the property receiving its certificate of completion. This ensures that the property is free of defects and adheres to the required quality control and safety standards, providing peace of mind for both builders and the new owner as they approach the completion date.

Types of Snags Commonly Found in Construction Projects

Common types of snags in construction projects include poor workmanship, design flaws, and latent defects. Poor workmanship can result from a lack of skills, experience, or adherence to design plans, leading to issues that require remediation.

Design flaws and material issues can affect the construction process and lead to non-conformities, impacting the overall quality and safety of the building.

Latent defects, on the other hand, are hidden issues that are not immediately visible upon completion of the construction but are present at the time of construction. These defects can have a significant impact on the structural integrity of the building and may require extensive repairs or even legal action.

Poor Workmanship

Poor workmanship is defined as work that is not completed to an acceptable standard due to a lack of skill, carelessness, or negligence. It may occur when a contractor does not adhere to industry quality standard practices, construction documents, or the installation instructions from the manufacturer.

Poor workmanship during snagging can be identified by unpainted door and window edges. This can cause rot or damage over time.

Installations or maintenance which are below standard can result in discomfort and extra energy bills. This is because either the heat output is inadequate or it operates inefficiently.

By identifying poor workmanship during the snagging process, these issues can be addressed before they escalate, preventing costly repairs and ensuring a high-quality finished product.

Design Flaws and Material Issues

Design flaws in construction refer to deficiencies in the design process that can lead to safety hazards, structural failures, and other issues.

Material issues can include the use of low-quality materials, inadequate workmanship, and non-adherence to construction codes. Both design flaws and material issues can result in non-conformities and pose safety risks, impacting the overall quality and safety of the building.

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Examples of design issues include unsuitable building layouts, poor lighting, inadequate ventilation, and failure to take into account factors such as accessibility, safety, and environmental impact.

Material problems during construction or after completion may arise due to the use of substandard or unsuitable materials, leading to structural problems or issues with moisture, such as leaks or dampness.

Latent Defects

Latent defects refer to construction defects that are not immediately visible upon completion of the works but are present at the time of construction. These defects can be difficult to detect and address due to their hidden nature.

Examples of latent defects may include inadequate wind-posts or wall ties leading to movement damage to walls, defective basement tanking allowing water penetration, or issues with the foundations.

The challenge in detecting and addressing latent defects lies in their hidden nature, making them difficult to identify and rectify.

By conducting a thorough snagging inspection and working closely with professional snagging companies, these latent defects can be detected and addressed before they cause significant damage or costly repairs.

The Importance of Professional Snagging Companies and Surveys

Utilising professional snagging companies for inspection and surveys is of great importance to guarantee that a newly erected building is free from any imperfections, cracks or faults and adheres to the necessary standards.

Professional snagging companies can assist in recognising any issues with craftsmanship and point out works that do not meet building regulations.

By providing a comprehensive report, a reliable snagging company can serve as proof to demonstrate that the snags are the responsibility of the house builder.

A snagging survey is an independent inspection of a property to identify any major imperfections that the original developers should have noticed and corrected.

The recommended standard for a snagging surveyor is to be registered with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) in accordance with industry best practice.

Benefits of Hiring a Professional Snagging Company

Hiring a professional snagging company provides numerous benefits, including expertise in accurately identifying legitimate defects and providing a comprehensive defect report.

This report serves as evidence to demonstrate that the snags are the responsibility of the house builder and helps builders to ensure that the property has been constructed according to industry standards.

Engaging a professional snagging company guarantees that any issues with the property are identified and corrected promptly, providing peace of mind for the new owner.

By identifying and rectifying defects before they escalate, costly repairs can be avoided, and the quality and safety of the property can be ensured.

The Snagging Survey: Cost and Process

The cost of a snagging survey typically ranges from ÂŁ400 to ÂŁ900 plus VAT, depending on the size of the property and its location.

The survey entails a complete and thorough evaluation of all areas of the property against applicable standards and usually takes three to five hours to complete, depending on the size of the property.

Upon completion of the snagging survey, a comprehensive report is provided, listing all snags identified during the inspection.

This report can be used as evidence to demonstrate the builder’s responsibility to rectify the issues within a specified time frame and helps to ensure a smooth handover of the property to the new owner.

Project Managers and Their Role in the Snagging Process

Project managers play a vital role in the snagging process, overseeing all aspects and ensuring that deliverables are achieved according to the contract’s specific guidelines.

They are responsible for creating benchmarks for success, building regulations, managing budgets, and planning work assignments to meet deadlines.

Project managers also facilitate inspections with the pertinent stakeholders, including the client, the contractor, and the snagging company.

By overseeing the snag list and ensuring that all snags are identified and dealt with promptly, project managers guarantee that the snagging contract process and building project is completed efficiently and effectively.

They are also accountable for communicating with all applicable stakeholders during the whole snagging list process, ensuring that all parties are informed of any modifications or updates to the snag list.

Coordinating Inspections and Snag Lists

Project managers coordinate inspections and snag lists by conducting inspections on a regular basis, creating a comprehensive snag list checklist, and guaranteeing that inspections are not conducted without a proper “builder’s clean”.

This methodical approach ensures that all defects are identified and addressed before the property is handed over to the client.

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Managing a snag list effectively involves regular updates and communication with all relevant stakeholders, including the client, contractor, and architect.

By keeping everyone informed of the progress in resolving snags, misunderstandings can be avoided, and the snagging process can be completed more efficiently.

Communicating with Stakeholders

Effective communication between project managers and stakeholders during the snagging process is crucial for the project’s success.

Project managers should use plain language and avoid technical terms when interacting with stakeholders, as well as providing specific directions and expectations to guarantee that everyone involved comprehends the snagging process.

By breaking down large projects into deliverables and tasks and managing expectations, project managers can ensure that all stakeholders are aware of their roles and responsibilities in the project.

Attentive listening to stakeholders is essential to guarantee that all individuals engaged in the snagging process are in agreement and that any misinterpretations are addressed promptly.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the snagging process in construction?

Snagging in construction is the process of identifying and rectifying any unfinished or deficient work that may exist prior to the practical completion of a project. It includes assessing, evaluating, and fixing any problems that are still outstanding, allowing for practical completion of construction project and a smooth handover of the project to the client.

This ensures the highest quality of the completed construction project, according to industry standards.

When should snagging be done?

Snagging should be done when the building works have been completed. As the developer usually needs to rectify any defects found, it is best to do this as soon as possible. Therefore, you should arrange for a snagging survey either before you move in new build home or very shortly afterwards.

What is snagging a new build before completion?

Snagging a new build before completion is the process of checking for any defects or problems that may remain in the property after building works have been completed. This includes any minor imperfections such as paintwork, fixtures and fittings, driveways, and other issues that may need to be addressed.

By snagging these potential issues before completing the purchase, you can avoid bigger problems in the future.

Does a builder have to do snagging?

Yes, builders are expected to do snagging work properly before handing over the keys to a customer. While they often get the major aspects right, snags are inevitable and so it’s essential that a professional builder takes responsibility for their work properly spotting and fixing them.

Snagging is a process of inspecting the walls of a newly built property for any defects, cracks or unfinished work. It is important to ensure that the property is of the highest quality before it is handed over to the owner.

What is the purpose of snagging in construction?

The purpose of snagging in construction projects is to identify and address any defects or issues, enabling construction projects to meet the required quality and safety standards.

Summary

In conclusion, the snagging process is an essential component of the construction industry, ensuring quality and safety standards in new properties.

By understanding the different types of snags, employing professional snagging companies, and effectively managing the snagging process, property owners can enjoy peace of mind in their new homes.

Remember, a well-executed snagging process not only guarantees a safe and comfortable living space, but also protects your investment for years to come.

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